GRADE 5

Introduction

This booklet is designed to give an overview of all the learning targets for students in Grade 5 throughout the year. The aim is that by the end of their year in Grade 5, every student at BWYA will be able to achieve all of the outcomes identified in this booklet. However, these standards are by no means meant to limit a student’s achievement, with all students encouraged to extend themselves to learn and grow to their potential.

The standards identified in this booklet come from highly respected curricula from around the world and were chosen because they are developmentally appropriate and sequentially build on each other from year to year. Teaching goals, assessments and student reports at the BWYA primary school all align to these standards, and these standards also align to those used in the BWYA secondary school.

It is hoped that this booklet will enhance parents’ understanding of what their child should be learning during Grade 5 and enable parents to better partner with the school in seeing their child be successful. Both parents and teachers are able to refer to the standards during conversations and then plan future growth goals in line with the standards’ expectations. Through this, everyone can work together in unity for the benefit of the child.

The standards for Grade 5 cover the following learning areas:

English Language Arts

English Language Arts

The BWYA English Language Arts Standards come from the United States Common Core Standards.

Reading: Literature
  • Quote accurately from a text when explaining what the text says explicitly and when drawing inferences from the text.
  • Determine a theme of a story, drama, or poem from details in the text, including how characters in a story or drama respond to challenges or how the speaker in a poem reflects upon a topic; summarize the text.
  • Compare and contrast two or more characters, settings, or events in a story or drama, drawing on specific details in the text (e.g., how characters interact).
  • Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including figurative language such as metaphors and similes.
  • Explain how a series of chapters, scenes, or stanzas fits together to provide the overall structure of a particular story, drama, or poem.
  • Describe how a narrator’s or speaker’s point of view influences how events are described.
  • Analyze how visual and multimedia elements contribute to the meaning, tone, or beauty of a text (e.g., graphic novel, multimedia presentation of fiction, folktale, myth, poem).
  • Compare and contrast stories in the same genre (e.g., mysteries and adventure stories) on their approaches to similar themes and topics.
  • By the end of the year, read and comprehend literature, including stories, dramas, and poetry, at the high end of the grades 4-5 text complexity band independently and proficiently.
Reading: Information Texts
  • Quote accurately from a text when explaining what the text says explicitly and when drawing inferences from the text.
  • Determine two or more main ideas of a text and explain how they are supported by key details; summarize the text.
  • Explain the relationships or interactions between two or more individuals, events, ideas, or concepts in a historical, scientific, or technical text based on specific information in the text.
  • Determine the meaning of general academic and domain-specific words and phrases in a text relevant to a grade 5 topic or subject area.
  • Compare and contrast the overall structure (e.g., chronology, comparison, cause/effect, problem/solution) of events, ideas, concepts, or information in two or more texts.
  • Analyze multiple accounts of the same event or topic, noting important similarities and differences in the point of view they represent.
  • Draw on information from multiple print or digital sources, demonstrating the ability to locate an answer to a question quickly or to solve a problem efficiently.
  • Explain how an author uses reasons and evidence to support particular points in a text, identifying which reasons and evidence support which point(s).
  • Integrate information from several texts on the same topic in order to write or speak about the subject knowledgeably.
  • By the end of the year, read and comprehend informational texts, including history/social studies, science, and technical texts, at the high end of the grades 4-5 text complexity band independently and proficiently.
Reading: Foundation Skills
  • Know and apply grade-level phonics and word analysis skills in decoding words.
  • Read with sufficient accuracy and fluency to support comprehension.
Writing
  • Write opinion pieces on topics or texts, supporting a point of view with reasons and information.
  • Write informative/explanatory texts to examine a topic and convey ideas and information clearly.
  • Write narratives to develop real or imagined experiences or events using effective technique, descriptive details, and clear event sequences.
  • Produce clear and coherent writing in which the development and organization are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience. (Grade-specific expectations for writing types are defined in standards 1-3 above.)
  • With guidance and support from peers and adults, develop and strengthen writing as needed by planning, revising, editing, rewriting, or trying a new approach. (Editing for conventions should demonstrate command of Language standards 1-3 up to and including grade 5 here.)
  • With some guidance and support from adults, use technology, including the Internet, to produce and publish writing as well as to interact and collaborate with others; demonstrate sufficient command of keyboarding skills to type a minimum of two pages in a single sitting.
  • Conduct short research projects that use several sources to build knowledge through investigation of different aspects of a topic.
  • Recall relevant information from experiences or gather relevant information from print and digital sources; summarize or paraphrase information in notes and finished work and provide a list of sources.
  • Draw evidence from literary or informational texts to support analysis, reflection, and research.
  • Write routinely over extended time frames (time for research, reflection, and revision) and shorter time frames (a single sitting or a day or two) for a range of discipline-specific tasks, purposes, and audiences.
Speaking and Listening
  • Engage effectively in a range of collaborative discussions (one-on-one, in groups, and teacher-led) with diverse partners on grade 5 topics and texts, building on others’ ideas and expressing their own clearly.
  • Summarize a written text read aloud or information presented in diverse media and formats, including visually, quantitatively, and orally.
  • Summarize the points a speaker makes and explain how each claim is supported by reasons and evidence.
  • Report on a topic or text or present an opinion, sequencing ideas logically and using appropriate facts and relevant, descriptive details to support main ideas or themes; speak clearly at an understandable pace.
  • Include multimedia components (e.g., graphics, sound) and visual displays in presentations when appropriate to enhance the development of main ideas or themes.
  • Adapt speech to a variety of contexts and tasks, using formal English when appropriate to task and situation. 
Language
  • Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English grammar and usage when writing or speaking.
  • Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English capitalization, punctuation, and spelling when writing.
  • Use knowledge of language and its conventions when writing, speaking, reading, or listening.
  • Determine or clarify the meaning of unknown and multiple-meaning words and phrases based on grade 5 reading and content, choosing flexibly from a range of strategies.
  • Demonstrate understanding of figurative language, word relationships, and nuances in word meanings.
  • Acquire and use accurately grade-appropriate general academic and domain-specific words and phrases, including those that signal contrast, addition, and other logical relationships (e.g., however, although, nevertheless, similarly, moreover, in addition).

Mathematics

Mathematics

The BWYA Mathematics Standards come from the United States Common Core Standards.

Overview

 In Grade 5, instructional time should focus on three critical areas:

  • Developing fluency with addition and subtraction of fractions, and developing understanding of the multiplication of fractions and of division of fractions in limited cases (unit fractions divided by whole numbers and whole numbers divided by unit fractions);

  • Extending division to 2-digit divisors, integrating decimal fractions into the place value system and developing understanding of operations with decimals to hundredths, and developing fluency with whole number and decimal operations;

  • Developing understanding of volume.

  • (1) Students apply their understanding of fractions and fraction models to represent the addition and subtraction of fractions with unlike denominators as equivalent calculations with like denominators. They develop fluency in calculating sums and differences of fractions and make reasonable estimates of them. Students also use the meaning of fractions, of multiplication and division, and the relationship between multiplication and division to understand and explain why the procedures for multiplying and dividing fractions make sense. (Note: this is limited to the case of dividing unit fractions by whole numbers and whole numbers by unit fractions.)

  • (2) Students develop understanding of why division procedures work based on the meaning of base-ten numerals and properties of operations. They finalize fluency with multi-digit addition, subtraction, multiplication, and division. They apply their understandings of models for decimals, decimal notation, and properties of operations to add and subtract decimals to hundredths. They develop fluency in these computations and make reasonable estimates of their results. Students use the relationship between decimals and fractions, as well as the relationship between finite decimals and whole numbers (i.e., a finite decimal multiplied by an appropriate power of 10 is a whole number), to understand and explain why the procedures for multiplying and dividing finite decimals make sense. They compute products and quotients of decimals to hundredths efficiently and accurately.

  • (3) Students recognize volume as an attribute of three-dimensional space. They understand that volume can be measured by finding the total number of same-size units of volume required to fill the space without gaps or overlaps. They understand that a 1-unit by 1-unit by 1-unit cube is the standard unit for measuring volume. They select appropriate units, strategies, and tools for solving problems that involve estimating and measuring volume. They decompose three-dimensional shapes and find volumes of right rectangular prisms by viewing them as decomposed into layers of arrays of cubes. They measure necessary attributes of shapes in order to determine volumes to solve real world and mathematical problems.

Operations and Algebraic Thinking
  • Use parentheses, brackets, or braces in numerical expressions, and evaluate expressions with these symbols.
  • Write simple expressions that record calculations with numbers and interpret numerical expressions without evaluating them. For example, express the calculation “add 8 and 7, then multiply by 2” as 2 × (8 + 7). Recognize that 3 × (18932 + 921) is three times as large as 18932 + 921, without having to calculate the indicated sum or product.
  • Generate two numerical patterns using two given rules. Identify apparent relationships between corresponding terms. Form ordered pairs consisting of corresponding terms from the two patterns and graph the ordered pairs on a coordinate plane. For example, given the rule “Add 3” and the starting number 0, and given the rule “Add 6” and the starting number 0, generate terms in the resulting sequences, and observe that the terms in one sequence are twice the corresponding terms in the other sequence. Explain informally why this is so.
Number and Operations in Base 10
  • Recognize that in a multi-digit number, a digit in one place represents 10 times as much as it represents in the place to its right and 1/10 of what it represents in the place to its left.
  • Explain patterns in the number of zeros of the product when multiplying a number by powers of 10 and explain patterns in the placement of the decimal point when a decimal is multiplied or divided by a power of 10. Use whole-number exponents to denote powers of 10.
  • Read, write, and compare decimals to thousandths.
  • Use place value understanding to round decimals to any place.
  • Fluently multiply multi-digit whole numbers using the standard algorithm.
  • Find whole-number quotients of whole numbers with up to four-digit dividends and two-digit divisors, using strategies based on place value, the properties of operations, and/or the relationship between multiplication and division. Illustrate and explain the calculation by using equations, rectangular arrays, and/or area models.
  • Add, subtract, multiply, and divide decimals to hundredths, using concrete models or drawings and strategies based on place value, properties of operations, and/or the relationship between addition and subtraction; relate the strategy to a written method and explain the reasoning used.
Number and Operations - Fractions
  • Add and subtract fractions with unlike denominators (including mixed numbers) by replacing given fractions with equivalent fractions in such a way as to produce an equivalent sum or difference of fractions with like denominators. For example, 2/3 + 5/4 = 8/12 + 15/12 = 23/12. (In general, a/b + c/d = (ad + bc)/bd.)
  • Solve word problems involving addition and subtraction of fractions referring to the same whole, including cases of unlike denominators, e.g., by using visual fraction models or equations to represent the problem. Use benchmark fractions and number sense of fractions to estimate mentally and assess the reasonableness of answers. For example, recognize an incorrect result 2/5 + 1/2 = 3/7, by observing that 3/7 < 1/2.
  • Interpret a fraction as division of the numerator by the denominator (a/b = a ÷ b). Solve word problems involving division of whole numbers leading to answers in the form of fractions or mixed numbers, e.g., by using visual fraction models or equations to represent the problem. For example, interpret 3/4 as the result of dividing 3 by 4, noting that 3/4 multiplied by 4 equals 3, and that when 3 wholes are shared equally among 4 people each person has a share of size 3/4. If 9 people want to share a 50-pound sack of rice equally by weight, how many pounds of rice should each person get? Between what two whole numbers does your answer lie?
  • Apply and extend previous understandings of multiplication to multiply a fraction or whole number by a fraction.
  • Interpret multiplication as scaling (resizing).
  • Solve real world problems involving multiplication of fractions and mixed numbers, e.g., by using visual fraction models or equations to represent the problem.
  • Apply and extend previous understandings of division to divide unit fractions by whole numbers and whole numbers by unit fractions.
Measurement and Data
  • Convert among different-sized standard measurement units within a given measurement system (e.g., convert 5 cm to 0.05 m), and use these conversions in solving multi-step, real world problems.
  • Make a line plot to display a data set of measurements in fractions of a unit (1/2, 1/4, 1/8). Use operations on fractions for this grade to solve problems involving information presented in line plots. For example, given different measurements of liquid in identical beakers, find the amount of liquid each beaker would contain if the total amount in all the beakers were redistributed equally.
  • Recognize volume as an attribute of solid figures and understand concepts of volume measurement.
  • Measure volumes by counting unit cubes, using cubic cm, cubic in, cubic ft, and improvised units.
  • Relate volume to the operations of multiplication and addition and solve real world and mathematical problems involving volume.
Geometry
  • Use a pair of perpendicular number lines, called axes, to define a coordinate system, with the intersection of the lines (the origin) arranged to coincide with the 0 on each line and a given point in the plane located by using an ordered pair of numbers, called its coordinates. Understand that the first number indicates how far to travel from the origin in the direction of one axis, and the second number indicates how far to travel in the direction of the second axis, with the convention that the names of the two axes and the coordinates correspond (e.g., x-axis and x-coordinate, y-axis and y-coordinate).
  • Represent real world and mathematical problems by graphing points in the first quadrant of the coordinate plane and interpret coordinate values of points in the context of the situation.
  • Understand that attributes belonging to a category of two-dimensional figures also belong to all subcategories of that category. For example, all rectangles have four right angles and squares are rectangles, so all squares have four right angles.
  • Classify two-dimensional figures in a hierarchy based on properties.

Science and Engineering

Science and Engineering

The BWYA Science and Engineering Standards come from the US Next Generations Science Standards.

Overview

The performance expectations in fifth grade help students formulate answers to questions such as: “When matter changes, does its weight change? How much water can be found in different places on Earth? Can new substances be created by combining other substances? How does matter cycle through ecosystems? Where does the energy in food come from and what is it used for? How do lengths and directions of shadows or relative lengths of day and night change from day to day, and how does the appearance of some stars change in different seasons?”

Students are able to describe that matter is made of particles too small to be seen through the development of a model. Students develop an understanding of the idea that regardless of the type of change that matter undergoes, the total weight of matter is conserved. Students determine whether the mixing of two or more substances results in new substances.

Through the development of a model using an example, students are able to describe ways the geosphere, biosphere, hydrosphere, and/or atmosphere interact. They describe and graph data to provide evidence about the distribution of water on Earth.

Students develop an understanding of the idea that plants get the materials they need for growth chiefly from air and water. Using models, students can describe the movement of matter among plants, animals, decomposers, and the environment and that energy in animals’ food was once energy from the sun.

Students are expected to develop an understanding of patterns of daily changes in length and direction of shadows, day and night, and the seasonal appearance of some stars in the night sky.

The crosscutting concepts of patterns; cause and effect; scale, proportion, and quantity; energy and matter; and systems and systems models are called out as organizing concepts for these disciplinary core ideas.

In the fifth grade performance expectations, students are expected to demonstrate grade-appropriate proficiency in developing and using models, planning and carrying out investigations, analysing and interpreting data, using mathematics and computational thinking, engaging in argument from evidence, and obtaining, evaluating, and communicating information; and to use these practices to demonstrate understanding of the core ideas.

Science Knowledge
  • Physical Science
  • Life Science
  • Earth and Space Science
  • Engineering, Technology and Applications of Science
Science Skills
  • Asking Questions and Defining Problems
  • Developing and Using Models
  • Planning and Carrying Out Investigations
  • Analyzing and Interpreting Data
  • Using Mathematics and Computational Thinking
  • Constructing Explanations and Designing Solutions
  • Engaging in Arguments from Evidence
  • Obtaining, Evaluating and Communicating Information

Grade 5 Achievement Standards

  • Develop a model to describe that matter is made of particles too small to be seen.
  • Measure and graph quantities to provide evidence that regardless of the type of change that occurs when heating, cooling, or mixing substances, the total weight of matter is conserved.
  • Make observations and measurements to identify materials based on their properties.
  • Conduct an investigation to determine whether the mixing of two or more substances results in new substances.
  • Support an argument that the gravitational force exerted by Earth on objects is directed down.
  • Use models to describe that energy in animals’ food (used for body repair, growth, motion, and to maintain body warmth) was once energy from the sun.
  • Support an argument that plants get the materials they need for growth chiefly from air and water.
  • Develop a model to describe the movement of matter among plants, animals, decomposers, and the environment.
  • Support an argument that differences in the apparent brightness of the sun compared to other stars is due to their relative distances from Earth.
  • Represent data in graphical displays to reveal patterns of daily changes in length and direction of shadows, day and night, and the seasonal appearance of some stars in the night sky.
  • Develop a model using an example to describe ways the geosphere, biosphere, hydrosphere, and/or atmosphere interact.
  • Describe and graph the amounts of salt water and fresh water in various reservoirs to provide evidence about the distribution of water on Earth.
  • Obtain and combine information about ways individual communities use science ideas to protect the Earth’s resources and environment.
  • Define a simple design problem reflecting a need or a want that includes specified criteria for success and constraints on materials, time, or cost.
  • Generate and compare multiple possible solutions to a problem based on how well each is likely to meet the criteria and constraints of the problem.
  • Plan and carry out fair tests in which variables are controlled and failure points are considered to identify aspects of a model or prototype that can be improved.

Units of Inquiry

Units of Inquiry

The BWYA Units of Inquiry Standards come from the International Primary Curriculum.

Subject Areas
  • History
  • Society
  • Geography
  • International Mindedness
Knowledge Standards
  • Know that the study of history is concerned with the past in relation to the present.
  • Know about the characteristic features of particular periods and societies.
  • Know about the general history of the host country.
  • Know about the general history of their home country.
  • Know about the characteristic features of a particular period in the history o the host country.
  • Know about ideas, beliefs, attitudes and experiences of people in the past.
  • Know about the social, cultural, religious and ethnic diversity of the periods.
  • Know the terms associated with the periods they have studied.
  • Know that the study of society is concerned with learning about living as members of groups.
  • Know about the major forms of national government, including those in the host country and their home country.
  • Know about significant international organisations.
  • Know about the major traditions, celebrations and ways of living in the host country and their home country.
  • Know that the study of geography is concerned with places and environments in the world around them.
  • Know about the main physical and human features and environmental issues in particular localities.
  • Know how the features of particular localities influence the nature of human activities within them.
  • Know about recent and proposed changes in particular localities.
  • Know about the major geographical features of the host country.
  • Know about the geography of the area around the school.
  • Know about the major geographical features in their home country.
  • Know about the weather and climate conditions in their home country and how they affect the environment and the lives of the people living there
  • Know about the weather and climatic conditions in the host country and how they affect the environment and the lives of people living there.
  • Know how people affect the environment.
  • Know about the key features related to the lives of people in their home country and, where appropriate, their parents’ home countries.
  • Know about the key features related to the lives of people in the host country and/or, where appropriate, other countries in which they have lived.
  • Know about ways in which the lives of people in the countries they have studied affect each other.
  • Know about similarities and differences between the lives of people in different countries.
Skill Standards
  • Be able to find out about aspects of the past from a range of sources.
  • Be able to describe and identify reasons for and results of historical events, situations, and changes in the periods they have studied.
  • Be able to describe how the history of the host country affects the lives of people who live there now.
  • Be able to describe how the history of one country affects that of another.
  • Be able to place the events, people and changes in the periods they have studied into a chronological framework.
  • Be able to enquire into the nature of groups and social institutions and their effects on people’s lives.
  • Be able to explain how the lives of people in one country or group are affected by the activities of other countries or groups.
  • Be able to identify ways in which people work together for mutual benefit.
Understanding Standards
  • Understand how some aspects of the past have been represented and interpreted in different ways.
  • Understand that historical sources can be different from and contradict one another and that they reflect their context of time, place and viewpoint.
  • Understand their own responsibilities in the groups to which they belong.
  • Understand the responsibilities of others in those groups and in the wider community.
  • Understand the way in which people fulfil their responsibilities affects the lives of others.
  • Understand how places fit into a wider geographical context.
  • Understand that the quality of the environment can be sustained and improved.
  • Understand that there is value both in the similarities and the differences between different countries.

Chinese Studies

Chinese Studies

The BWYA Chinese Studies Standards come from the Chinese National Curriculum.

识字和写字
  • 有较强的独立识字能力,认识常用汉字,会写规定的汉字。
  • 行款整齐,力求美观,有一定的速度。
  • 有良好的书写习惯。
阅读
  • 能够正确、流利、有感情地朗读课文。
  • 默读有一定的速度,默读一般读物每分钟不少于300字。学习浏览、扩大知识面,根据需要搜集信息。
  • 能借助词典理解词语的意义。能联系上下文和自己的积累,推想课文中有关词句的意思,辨别词语的感情色彩,体会其表达效果。
  • 在阅读中揣摩文章的表达顺序,体会作者的思想感情,初步领会文章基本的表达方法。在交流和讨论中,敢于提出自己的看法,作出自己的判断。
  • 继续学习预习课文。能自学生字词,初步了解课文内容,提出疑难问题,养成预习的习惯。
  • 背诵优秀诗文,注意在诵读过程中体验情感,展开想象,领悟内容。
  • 扩展阅读面,课外阅读总量不少于100万字。
习作
  • 懂得写作是为了自我表达和与人交流。
  • 养成留心观察周围事物的习惯,有意识地丰富自己的见闻素材,珍视个人的独特感受,积累习作素材。
  • 能写简单的记实作文和想象作文,内容具体,感情真实。能根据内容表达需要,分段表述。
  • 修改自己的习作,并主动与他人交换修改,做到语句通顺,行款正确,书写规范,整洁。根据表达需要,正确使用常用的标点符号。
  • 习作要有一定速度。习作每学年14次左右。
口语交际
  • 与人交流能尊重、理解对方。
  • 乐于参与讨论,敢于发表自己的意见。
  • 听人说话认真耐心,能抓住要点,并能简要转述。
  • 表达要有条理,语气、语调适当。
  • 能根据对象和场合,稍作准备,做简单的发言。
  • 注意语言优美,抵制不文明语言。

The BWYA Music Standards come from the US National Association for Music Education.

Creating
  • Improvise rhythmic, melodic, and harmonic ideas, and explain connection to specific purpose and context (such as social, cultural, and historical).
  • Generate musical ideas (such as rhythms, melodies, and accompaniment patterns) within specific related tonalities, meters, and simple chord changes.
  • Demonstrate selected and developed musical ideas for improvisations, arrangements, or compositions to express intent, and explain connection to purpose and context.
  • Use standard and/or iconic notation and/or recording technology to document personal rhythmic, melodic, and two-chord harmonic musical ideas.
  • Evaluate, refine, and document revisions to personal music, applying teacher- provided and collaboratively- developed criteria and feedback, and explain rationale for changes.
  • Present the final version of personal created music to others that demonstrates craftsmanship and explain connection to expressive intent.
Performing
  • Demonstrate and explain how the selection of music to perform is influenced by personal interest, knowledge, and context, as well as their personal and others’ technical skill.
  • Demonstrate understanding of the structure and the elements of music (such as rhythm, pitch, form, and harmony) in music selected for performance.
  • When analyzing selected music, read and perform using standard notation.
  • Explain how context (such as social, cultural, and historical) informs performances.
  • Demonstrate and explain how intent is conveyed through interpretive decisions and expressive qualities (such as dynamics, tempo, timbre, and articulation/style).
  • Apply teacher-provided and established criteria and feedback to evaluate the accuracy and expressiveness of ensemble and personal performances.
  • Rehearse to refine technical accuracy and expressive qualities to address challenges and show improvement over time.
  • Perform music, alone or with others, with expression, technical accuracy, and appropriate interpretation.
  • Demonstrate performance decorum and audience etiquette appropriate for the context, venue, genre, and style.
Responding
  • Demonstrate and explain, citing evidence, how selected music connects to and is influenced by specific interests, experiences, purposes, or contexts.
  • Demonstrate and explain, citing evidence, how responses to music are informed by the structure, the use of the elements of music, and context (such as social, cultural, and historical).
  • Demonstrate and explain how the expressive qualities (such as dynamics, tempo, timbre, and articulation) are used in performers’ and personal interpretations to reflect expressive intent.
  • Evaluate musical works and performances, applying established criteria, and explain appropriateness to the context, citing evidence from the elements of music.
Connecting
  • Demonstrate how interests, knowledge, and skills relate to personal choices and intent when creating, performing, and responding to music.
  • Demonstrate understanding of relationships between music and the other arts, other disciplines, varied contexts, and daily life.

Visual Arts

Visual Arts

The BWYA Visual Arts Standards come from the US National Art Education Association.

Creating
  • Combine ideas to generate an innovative plan for art-making.
  • Identify and demonstrate various investigative methods in choosing an approach for beginning a work of art.
  • Experiment and develop skills in multiple art-making techniques and approaches through practice using developmentally appropriate craftsmanship.
  • Demonstrate resourceful care for and use of materials, tools, and equipment.
  • Identify, describe, and visually document places and/or objects of personal significance.
  • Communicate personal decisions in art-making in an artist statement or another format.
Presenting
  • Define and explain the qualifications and responsibilities of a curator.
  • Demonstrate effective use of methods and techniques for preparing and presenting artwork.
  • Explain how an exhibition in a traditional or emerging presentation space provides ideas and information about a specific concept or topic.
Responding
  • Explain how images can convey cultural associations.
  • Compare one’s own interpretation of a work of art with the interpretation of others.
  • Interpret art to identify ideas and mood conveyed by analyzing context, subject matter, and use of media while using appropriate art vocabulary.
  • Recognize how styles, genres, media, and historical and cultural contexts influence criteria used to evaluate works of art.
Connecting
  • Create art based on personal experiences, current interests, and surroundings.
  • Identify how art is used to inform or change beliefs, values, or behaviors of an individual or society.

The BWYA Drama Standards come from the US Educational Theatre Association’s Core Theatre Standards.

Creating
  • Identify physical qualities that might reveal a character’s inner traits in the imagined world of a drama/theatre work. 
  • Propose design ideas that support the story and given circumstances in a drama/theatre work.
  • Imagine how a character’s inner thoughts impact the story and given circumstances in a drama/ theatre work
  • Devise original ideas for a drama/theatre work that reflect collective inquiry about characters and their given circumstances. 
  • Participate in defined responsibilities required to present a drama/theatre work informally to an audience. 
  • Revise and improve an improvised or scripted drama/theatre work through repetition and self-review. 
  • Use physical and vocal exploration for character development in an improvised or scripted drama/theatre work.
  • Create innovative solutions to design and technical problems that arise in rehearsal for a drama/theatre work. 
Performance
  • Describe the underlying thoughts and emotions that create dialogue and action in a drama/theatre work. 
  • Use physical choices to create meaning in a drama/theatre work. 
  • Choose acting exercises that can be applied to a drama/theatre work. 
  • Demonstrate the use of technical elements in a drama/theatre work.
  • Present drama/theatre work informally to an audience.
Responding
  • Explain personal reactions to artistic choices made in a drama/theatre work through participation and observation. 
  • Justify responses based on personal experiences when participating in or observing a drama/theatre work. 
  • Explain responses to characters based on cultural perspectives when participating in or observing drama/theatre work. 
  • Investigate the effects of emotions on posture, gesture, breathing, and vocal intonation in a drama/theatre work.
  • Develop and implement a plan to evaluate drama/theatre work. 
  • Assess how technical elements represent the theme of a drama/theatre work. 
  • Recognize how a character’s circumstances impact an audience’s perspective in a drama/theatre work. 
Connecting
  • Explain how drama/theatre connects oneself to a community or culture.
  • Investigate historical, global and social issues expressed in drama/theatre work. 
  • Analyze commonalities and differences between stories set in different cultures in preparation for a drama/theatre work. 
  • Identify historical sources that explain drama/theatre terminology and conventions.

Physical Education

Physical Education

The BWYA Physical Education Standards come from the Shape America Grade Level Outcomes.

Overview

By the end of Grade 5, the learner will demonstrate competence in fundamental motor skills and selected combinations of skills; use basic movement concepts in dance, gymnastics and small-sided practice tasks; identify basic health-related fitness concepts; exhibit acceptance of self and others in physical activities; and identify the benefits of a physically active lifestyle.

Motor Skills and Movement Patterns
  • Demonstrates mature patterns of locomotor skills in dynamic small-sided practice tasks, gymnastics and dance. 
  • Combines locomotor and manipulative skills in a variety of small-sided practice tasks/games environments. 
  • Combines traveling with manipulative skills for execution to a target (e.g., scoring in soccer, hockey and basketball). 
  • Uses appropriate pacing for a variety of running distances. 
  • Combines jumping and landing patterns with loco-motor and manipulative skills in dance, gymnastics and small-sided practice tasks in games environments.
  • Combines locomotor skills in cultural as well as creative dances (self and group) with correct rhythm and pattern. 
  • Combines balance and transferring weight in a gymnastics sequence or dance with a partner. 
  • Transfer weight in gymnastic and dance environment.
  • Performs curling, twisting and stretching actions with correct application in dance, gymnastics, small-sided practice tasks and games environments. 
  • Combines locomotor skills and movement concepts (levels, shapes, extensions, pathways, force, time, flow) to create and perform a dance with a group. 
  • Combines actions, balances and weight transfers to create a gymnastics sequence with a partner on equipment or apparatus. 
  • Throws underhand using a mature pattern in nondynamic environments (closed skills), with different sizes and types of objects.
  • Throws underhand to a large target with accuracy. 
  • Throws overhand using a mature pattern in nondynamic environments (closed skills), with different sizes and types of balls. 
  • Throws overhand to a large target with accuracy. 
  • Throws with accuracy, both partners moving. 
  • Throws with reasonable accuracy in dynamic, small-sided practice tasks. 
  • Catches a batted ball above the head, at chest or waist level, and along the ground using a mature pattern in a nondynamic environment (closed skills). 
  • Catches with accuracy, both partners moving. 
  • Catches with reasonable accuracy in dynamic, small-sided practice tasks. 
  • Combines hand drib- bling with other skills during 1v1 practice tasks. 
  • Combines foot drib- bling with other skills in 1v1 practice tasks. 
  • Passes with the feet using a mature pattern as both partners travel. 
  • Receives a pass with the feet using a mature pattern as both partners travel. 
  • Dribbles with hands or feet with mature patterns in a variety of small-sided game forms. 
  • Volleys a ball using a two-hand pattern, sending it upward to a target. 
  • Strikes an object consecutively, with a partner, using a short-handled implement, over a net or against a wall, in either a competitive or cooperative game environment.
  • Strikes a pitched ball with a bat using a mature pattern. 
  • Combines striking with a long implement (e.g., bat, hockey stick) with receiving and traveling skills in a small-sided game. 
  • Combines manipulative skills and traveling for execution to a target (e.g., scoring in soccer, hockey and basketball). 
  • a target (e.g., scoring in soccer, hockey and basketball). 
  • Creates a jump rope routine with a partner, using either a short or long rope.
Movement and Performance
  • Combines spatial concepts with locomotor and non-locomotor movements for small groups in gymnastics, dance and games environments. 
  • Combines movement concepts with skills in small-sided practice tasks in game environments, gymnastics and dance with self-direction. 
  • Applies movement concepts to strategy in game situations. 
  • Applies the concepts of direction and force to strike an object with a long-handled implement. 
  • Analyzes movement situations and applies movement concepts (e.g., force, direction, speed, pathways, extensions) in small-sided practice tasks in game environments, dance and gymnastics. 
Physical Activity and Fitness
  • Charts and analyzes physical activity outside physical education class for fitness benefits of activities. 
  • Engages actively in all of the activities of physical education. 
  • Differentiates between skill-related and health-related fitness.
  • Identifies the need for warm-up and cool-down relative to various physical activities. 
  • Analyzes results of fitness assessment (pre and post), com-paring results to fitness components for good health. 
  • Designs a fitness plan to address ways to use physical activity to enhance fitness. 
  • Analyzes the impact of food choices relative to physical activity, youth sports and personal health. 
Responsible Personal and Social Behaviour
  • Engages in physical activity with responsible interpersonal behavior (e.g., peer to peer, student to teacher, student to referee). 
  • Participates with responsible personal behavior in a variety of physical activity contexts, environments and facilities. 
  • Exhibits respect for self with appropriate behavior while engaging in physical activity. 
  • Gives corrective feedback respectfully to peers. 
  • Accepts, recognizes and actively involves others with both higher and lower skill abilities into physical activities and group projects. 
  • Critiques the etiquette involved in rules of various game activities. 
  • Applies safety principles with age-appropriate physical activities. 
Values Physical Activity
  • Compares the health benefits of participating in selected physical activities.
  • Express (via written essay, visual creative dance) the enjoyment and/or challenge of participating in a favorite physical activity.
  • Analyzes different physical activities for enjoyment and challenge, identifying reasons for a positive or negative response.
  • Describes the social benefits gained from participating in physical activity (e.g., recess, youth sport).

Schoolwide Learner Outcomes

Schoolwide Learner Outcomes

The BWYA Schoolwide Learner Outcomes were developed by Beijing World Youth Academy.

Respect

We show respect in the way we treat others and are tolerant of our differences

International Mindedness

We show our international-mindedness in the way we work to make our school, community, and world a better place.

Fairness

We show our fairness in the way we share, listen, stay open-minded, and play by the rules.

Caring

We show that we are caring in the way that we are kind, compassionate, and happy to help.

Resilience

We show our resilience in the way that we persevere, believe in ourselves, and always do our best.

Adaptability

We show our adaptability in the way that we are flexible, abide by local rules and customs, and practice ‘give and take’.

Knowledge

We show our knowledge by having inquiring minds, and by striving to be independent learners that are happy to engage socially and intellectually.