GRADE 1

Introduction

This booklet is designed to give an overview of all the learning targets for students in Grade 1 throughout the year. The aim is that by the end of their year in Grade 1, every student at BWYA will be able to achieve all of the outcomes identified in this booklet. However, these standards are by no means meant to limit a student’s achievement, with all students encouraged to extend themselves to learn and grow to their potential.

The standards identified in this booklet come from highly respected curricula from around the world and were chosen because they are developmentally appropriate and sequentially build on each other from year to year. Teaching goals, assessments and student reports at the BWYA primary school all align to these standards, and these standards also align to those used in the BWYA secondary school.

It is hoped that this booklet will enhance parents’ understanding of what their child should be learning during Grade 1 and enable parents to better partner with the school in seeing their child be successful. Both parents and teachers are able to refer to the standards during conversations and then plan future growth goals in line with the standards’ expectations. Through this, everyone can work together in unity for the benefit of the child.

The standards for Grade 1 cover the following learning areas:

English Language Arts

English Language Arts

The BWYA English Language Arts Standards come from the United States Common Core Standards.

Reading: Literature
  • Ask and answer questions about key details in a text.
  • Retell stories, including key details, and demonstrate understanding of their central message or lesson.
  • Describe characters, settings, and major events in a story, using key details.
  • Identify words and phrases in stories or poems that suggest feelings or appeal to the senses.
  • Explain major differences between books that tell stories and books that give information, drawing on a wide reading of a range of text types.
  • Identify who is telling the story at various points in a text.
  • Use illustrations and details in a story to describe its characters, setting, or events.
  • Compare and contrast the adventures and experiences of characters in stories.
  • With prompting and support, read prose and poetry of appropriate complexity for Grade 1.
Reading: Information Texts
  • Ask and answer questions about key details in a text.
  • Identify the main topic and retell key details of a text.
  • Describe the connection between two individuals, events, ideas, or pieces of information in a text.
  • Ask and answer questions to help determine or clarify the meaning of words and phrases in a text.
  • Know and use various text features (e.g., headings, tables of contents, glossaries, electronic menus, icons) to locate key facts or information in a text.
  • Distinguish between information provided by pictures or other illustrations and information provided by the words in a text.
  • Use the illustrations and details in a text to describe its key ideas.
  • Identify the reasons an author gives to support points in a text.
  • Identify basic similarities in and differences between two texts on the same topic (e.g., in illustrations, descriptions, or procedures).
  • With prompting and support, read informational texts appropriately complex for Grade 1.
Reading: Foundation Skills
  • Demonstrate understanding of the organization and basic features of print.
  • Demonstrate understanding of spoken words, syllables, and sounds (phonemes).
  • Know and apply grade-level phonics and word analysis skills in decoding words.
  • Read with sufficient accuracy and fluency to support comprehension.
Writing
  • Write opinion pieces in which they introduce the topic or name the book they are writing about, state an opinion, supply a reason for the opinion, and provide some sense of closure.
  • Write informative/explanatory texts in which they name a topic, supply some facts about the topic, and provide some sense of closure.
  • Write narratives in which they recount two or more appropriately sequenced events, include some details regarding what happened, use temporal words to signal event order, and provide some sense of closure.
  • With guidance and support from adults, focus on a topic, respond to questions and suggestions from peers, and add details to strengthen writing as needed.
  • With guidance and support from adults, use a variety of digital tools to produce and publish writing, including in collaboration with peers.
  • Participate in shared research and writing projects (e.g., explore a number of “how-to” books on a given topic and use them to write a sequence of instructions).
  • With guidance and support from adults, recall information from experiences or gather information from provided sources to answer a question.
Speaking and Listening
  • Participate in collaborative conversations with diverse partners about Grade 1 topics and texts with peers and adults in small and larger groups.
  • Ask and answer questions about key details in a text read aloud or information presented orally or through other media.
  • Ask and answer questions about what a speaker says in order to gather additional information or clarify something that is not understood.
  • Describe people, places, things, and events with relevant details, expressing ideas and feelings clearly.
  • Add drawings or other visual displays to descriptions when appropriate to clarify ideas, thoughts, and feelings.
  • Produce complete sentences when appropriate to task and situation.
Language
  • Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English grammar and usage when writing or speaking.
  • Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English capitalization, punctuation, and spelling when writing.
  • Determine or clarify the meaning of unknown and multiple-meaning words and phrases based on Grade 1 reading and content, choosing flexibly from an array of strategies.
  • With guidance and support from adults, explore word relationships and nuances in word meanings.
  • Use words and phrases acquired through conversations, reading and being read to, and responding to texts, including using frequently occurring conjunctions to signal simple relationships (e.g., because).

Mathematics

Mathematics

The BWYA Mathematics Standards come from the United States Common Core Standards.

Overview

In Grade 1, instructional time should focus on four critical areas:

  • Developing understanding of addition, subtraction, and strategies for addition and subtraction within 20;
  • Developing understanding of whole number relationships and place value, including grouping in tens and ones;
  • Developing understanding of linear measurement and measuring lengths as iterating length units; and
  • Reasoning about attributes of, and composing and decomposing geometric shapes.
  • (1) Students develop strategies for adding and subtracting whole numbers based on their prior work with small numbers. They use a variety of models, including discrete objects and length-based models (e.g., cubes connected to form lengths), to model add-to, take-from, put-together, take-apart, and compare situations to develop meaning for the operations of addition and subtraction, and to develop strategies to solve arithmetic problems with these operations. Students understand connections between counting and addition and subtraction (e.g., adding two is the same as counting on two). They use properties of addition to add whole numbers and to create and use increasingly sophisticated strategies based on these properties (e.g., “making tens”) to solve addition and subtraction problems within 20. By comparing a variety of solution strategies, children build their understanding of the relationship between addition and subtraction.
  • (2) Students develop, discuss, and use efficient, accurate, and generalizable methods to add within 100 and subtract multiples of 10. They compare whole numbers (at least to 100) to develop understanding of and solve problems involving their relative sizes. They think of whole numbers between 10 and 100 in terms of tens and ones (especially recognizing the numbers 11 to 19 as composed of a ten and some ones). Through activities that build number sense, they understand the order of the counting numbers and their relative magnitudes.
  • (3) Students develop an understanding of the meaning and processes of measurement, including underlying concepts such as iterating (the mental activity of building up the length of an object with equal-sized units) and the transitivity principle for indirect measurement.
  • (4) Students compose and decompose plane or solid figures (e.g., put two triangles together to make a quadrilateral) and build understanding of part-whole relationships as well as the properties of the original and composite shapes. As they combine shapes, they recognize them from different perspectives and orientations, describe their geometric attributes, and determine how they are alike and different, to develop the background for measurement and for initial understandings of properties such as congruence and symmetry.
Operations and Algebraic Thinking
  • Use addition and subtraction within 20 to solve word problems involving situations of adding to, taking from, putting together, taking apart, and comparing, with unknowns in all positions, e.g., by using objects, drawings, and equations with a symbol for the unknown number to represent the problem.
  • Solve word problems that call for addition of three whole numbers whose sum is less than or equal to 20, e.g., by using objects, drawings, and equations with a symbol for the unknown number to represent the problem.
  • Apply properties of operations as strategies to add and subtract.2 Examples: If 8 + 3 = 11 is known, then 3 + 8 = 11 is also known. (Commutative property of addition.) To add 2 + 6 + 4, the second two numbers can be added to make a ten, so 2 + 6 + 4 = 2 + 10 = 12. (Associative property of addition.)
  • Understand subtraction as an unknown-addend problem. For example, subtract 10 – 8 by finding the number that makes 10 when added to 8.
  • Relate counting to addition and subtraction (e.g., by counting on 2 to add 2).
  • Add and subtract within 20, demonstrating fluency for addition and subtraction within 10. Use strategies such as counting on; making ten (e.g., 8 + 6 = 8 + 2 + 4 = 10 + 4 = 14); decomposing a number leading to a ten (e.g., 13 – 4 = 13 – 3 – 1 = 10 – 1 = 9); using the relationship between addition and subtraction (e.g., knowing that 8 + 4 = 12, one knows 12 – 8 = 4); and creating equivalent but easier or known sums (e.g., adding 6 + 7 by creating the known equivalent 6 + 6 + 1 = 12 + 1 = 13).
  • Understand the meaning of the equal sign, and determine if equations involving addition and subtraction are true or false. For example, which of the following equations are true and which are false? 6 = 6, 7 = 8 – 1, 5 + 2 = 2 + 5, 4 + 1 = 5 + 2.
  • Determine the unknown whole number in an addition or subtraction equation relating three whole numbers. For example, determine the unknown number that makes the equation true in each of the equations 8 + ? = 11, 5 = _ – 3, 6 + 6 = _.
Number and Operations in Base 10
  • Count to 120, starting at any number less than 120. In this range, read and write numerals and represent a number of objects with a written numeral.
  • Understand that the two digits of a two-digit number represent amounts of tens and ones.
  • Compare two two-digit numbers based on meanings of the tens and ones digits, recording the results of comparisons with the symbols >, =, and <.
  • Add within 100, including adding a two-digit number and a one-digit number, and adding a two-digit number and a multiple of 10, using concrete models or drawings and strategies based on place value, properties of operations, and/or the relationship between addition and subtraction; relate the strategy to a written method and explain the reasoning used. Understand that in adding two-digit numbers, one adds tens and tens, ones and ones; and sometimes it is necessary to compose a ten.
  • Given a two-digit number, mentally find 10 more or 10 less than the number, without having to count; explain the reasoning used.
  • Subtract multiples of 10 in the range 10-90 from multiples of 10 in the range 10-90 (positive or zero differences), using concrete models or drawings and strategies based on place value, properties of operations, and/or the relationship between addition and subtraction; relate the strategy to a written method and explain the reasoning used.
Measurement and Data
  • Order three objects by length; compare the lengths of two objects indirectly by using a third object.
  • Express the length of an object as a whole number of length units, by laying multiple copies of a shorter object (the length unit) end to end; understand that the length measurement of an object is the number of same-size length units that span it with no gaps or overlaps. Limit to contexts where the object being measured is spanned by a whole number of length units with no gaps or overlaps.
  • Tell and write time in hours and half-hours using analog and digital clocks.
  • Organize, represent, and interpret data with up to three categories; ask and answer questions about the total number of data points, how many in each category, and how many more or less are in one category than in another.
Geometry
  • Distinguish between defining attributes (e.g., triangles are closed and three-sided) versus non-defining attributes (e.g., color, orientation, overall size); build and draw shapes to possess defining attributes.
  • Compose two-dimensional shapes (rectangles, squares, trapezoids, triangles, half-circles, and quarter-circles) or three-dimensional shapes (cubes, right rectangular prisms, right circular cones, and right circular cylinders) to create a composite shape, and compose new shapes from the composite shape.
  • Partition circles and rectangles into two and four equal shares, describe the shares using the words halves, fourths, and quarters, and use the phrases half of, fourth of, and quarter of. Describe the whole as two of, or four of the shares. Understand for these examples that decomposing into more equal shares creates smaller shares.

Science and Engineering

Science and Engineering

The BWYA Science and Engineering Standards come from the US Next Generations Science Standards.

Overview

The performance expectations in first grade help students formulate answers to questions such as:

“What happens when materials vibrate? What happens when there is no light? What are some ways plants and animals meet their needs so that they can survive and grow? How are parents and their children similar and different? What objects are in the sky and how do they seem to move?”

Students are expected to develop understanding of the relationship between sound and vibrating materials as well as between the availability of light and ability to see objects. The idea that light travels from place to place can be understood by students at this level through determining the effect of placing objects made with different materials in the path of a beam of light. Students are also expected to develop understanding of how plants and animals use their external parts to help them survive, grow, and meet their needs as well as how behaviors of parents and offspring help the offspring survive. The understanding is developed that young plants and animals are like, but not exactly the same as, their parents. Students are able to observe, describe, and predict some patterns of the movement of objects in the sky.

The crosscutting concepts of patterns; cause and effect; structure and function; and influence of engineering, technology, and science on society and the natural world are called out as organizing concepts for these disciplinary core ideas.

In the first grade performance expectations, students are expected to demonstrate grade-appropriate proficiency in planning and carrying out investigations, analyzing and interpreting data, constructing explanations and designing solutions, and obtaining, evaluating, and communicating information.

Students are expected to use these practices to demonstrate understanding of the core ideas.

Science Knowledge
  • Physical Science
  • Life Science
  • Earth and Space Science
  • Engineering, Technology and Applications of Science
Science Skills
  • Asking Questions and Defining Problems
  • Developing and Using Models
  • Planning and Carrying Out Investigations
  • Analyzing and Interpreting Data
  • Using Mathematics and Computational Thinking
  • Constructing Explanations and Designing Solutions
  • Engaging in Arguments from Evidence
  • Obtaining, Evaluating and Communicating Information

Grade 1 Achievement Standards

  • Plan and conduct investigations to provide evidence that vibrating materials can make sound and that sound can make materials vibrate.
  • Make observations to construct an evidence-based account that objects can be seen only when illuminated.
  • Plan and conduct an investigation to determine the effect of placing objects made with different materials in the path of a beam of light.
  • Use tools and materials to design and build a device that uses light or sound to solve the problem of communicating over a distance.
  • Use materials to design a solution to a human problem by mimicking how plants and/or animals use their external parts to help them survive, grow, and meet their needs.
  • Read texts and use media to determine patterns in behavior of parents and offspring that help offspring survive.
  • Make observations to construct an evidence-based account that young plants and animals are like, but not exactly like, their parents.
  • Use observations of the sun, moon, and stars to describe patterns that can be predicted.
  • Make observations at different times of year to relate the amount of daylight to the time of year.

Units of Inquiry

Units of Inquiry

The BWYA Units of Inquiry Standards come from the International Primary Curriculum.

Subject Areas
  • History
  • Society
  • Geography
  • International Mindedness
Knowledge Standards
  • Know stories about a range of people who have lived in a variety of cultures in the past.
  • Know about a range of events that happened in the past.
  • Know that people have individual characteristics.
  • Know some of the rules of groups to which they belong.
  • Know about some of the factors that can harm or improve their health.
  • Know about some of the factors that can improve or endanger their safety.
  • Know about some major celebrations – including some in the host country.
  • Know about the main physical and human features of particular localities.
  • Know about similarities and differences between different localities.
  • Know about how land and buildings are used in particular localities.
  • Know about the weather and climatic conditions in particular localities and how they affect the environment and lives of people living there.
  • Know that the world extends beyond their own locality and that the places they study exist within a broader geographical context.
  • Know that people can harm or improve the environment.
  • Know that children within the class and school have different home countries.
  • Know the names and approximate locations of the home countries of children within the class (and/or school).
  • Know about some of the similarities and differences between the lives of children in the different home countries and in the host country.
Skill Standards
  • Be able to use key words and phrases relating to the passing of time.
  • Be able to order events and objects into a sequence.
  • Be able to identify differences between their own lives and those of people who have lived in the past.
  • Be able to find out about aspects of the past from a range of sources of information.
  • Be able to use geographical terms.
  • Be able to follow directions.
  • Be able to describe the geographical features of the school site and other familiar places.
  • Be able to make maps and plans of real and imaginary places, using pictures and symbols.
  • Be able to use maps at a variety of scales to locate the position and simple geographical features of the host country and their home country.
  • Be able to use secondary sources to obtain simple geographical information.
  • Be able to express views on the attractive and unattractive features of an environment.
  • Be able to communicate their geographical knowledge and understanding in a variety of ways.
  • Be able to respect one another’s individuality and independence.
  • Be able to work with each other where appropriate.
Understanding Standards
  • Understand that events and people’s actions have cause and effects.
  • Understand that the past is represented in a variety of ways.
  • Understand that they belong to a number of groups (e.g. family, school, nation).

Chinese Studies

Chinese Studies

The BWYA Chinese Studies Standards come from the Chinese National Curriculum.

识字和写字
  • 喜欢学习汉字,有主动识字的愿望。
  • 掌握汉字的基本笔画和常用的偏旁部首,能按笔顺规则用硬笔写字,注意间架结构,初步感受汉字的形体美。
  • 写字姿势要正确,字要写得规范、端正、整洁、努力养成良好的写字习惯。
  • 学会汉语拼音,能读准声母、韵母、声调和整体认读音节,能准确的拼读音节,正确书写声母、韵母和音节。
阅读
  • 喜欢阅读,感受阅读的乐趣,初步养成爱护图书的习惯。
  • 学习用普通话正确、流利、有感情的朗读课文。
  • 结合上下文和生活实际了解课文中词句的意思,在阅读中积累词语,借助读物中的图画阅读。
  • 诵读儿歌,童谣和浅近的古诗,展开想象,获得初步的情感体验,感受语言的优美。
  • 认识课文中出现的常用标点符号,在阅读中,体会句号、问号、感叹号所表达的不同语气。
  • 积累自己喜欢的成语和格言警句。背诵优秀诗文,课外阅读总量不少于2万字。
习作
  • 对写话有兴趣,写自己想说的话。
  • 在写话中乐于运用阅读和生活中学到的词语。
  • 学习使用逗号、句号、问号、感叹号。
口语交际
  • 能认真听别人讲话,努力了解讲话的主要内容。
  • 听故事、看音像作品,能复述大意和自己感兴趣的情节。
  • 与别人交谈,态度自然大方,有礼貌。
  • 有表达的自信心,积极参加讨论,善于发表自己的意见。

The BWYA Music Standards come from the US National Association for Music Education.

Creating
  • With limited guidance, create musical ideas (such as answering a musical question) for a specific purpose.
  • With limited guidance, generate musical ideas in multiple tonalities (such as major and minor) and meters (such as duple and triple).
  • With limited guidance, demonstrate and discuss personal reasons for selecting musical ideas that represent expressive intent.
  • With limited guidance, use iconic or standard notation and/or recording technology to document and organize personal musical ideas.
  • With limited guidance, discuss and apply personal, peer, and teacher feedback to refine personal musical ideas.
  • With limited guidance, convey expressive intent for a specific purpose by presenting a final version of personal musical ideas to peers or informal audience.
Performing
  • With limited guidance, demonstrate and discuss personal interest in, knowledge about, and purpose of varied musical selections.
  • With limited guidance, demonstrate knowledge of music concepts (such as beat and melodic contour) in music from a variety of cultures selected for performance.
  • When analyzing selected music, read and perform rhythmic patterns using iconic or standard notation.
  • Demonstrate and describe music’s expressive qualities (such as dynamics and tempo).
  • With limited guidance, apply personal, teacher, and peer feedback to refine performances.
  • With limited guidance, use suggested strategies in rehearsal to address interpretive challenges of music.
  • With limited guidance, perform music for a specific purpose with expression.
  • Perform appropriately for the audience and purpose.
Responding
  • With limited guidance, identify and demonstrate how personal interests and experiences influence musical selection for specific purposes.
  • With limited guidance, demonstrate and identify how specific music concepts (such as beat or pitch) are used in various styles of music for a purpose.
  • With limited guidance, demonstrate and identify expressive qualities (such as dynamics and tempo) that reflect creators’/ performers’ expressive intent.
  • With limited guidance, apply personal and expressive preferences in the evaluation of music for specific purposes.
Connecting
  • Demonstrate how interests, knowledge, and skills relate to personal choices and intent when creating, performing, and responding to music.
  • Demonstrate understanding of relationships between music and the other arts, other disciplines, varied contexts, and daily life.

Visual Arts

Visual Arts

The BWYA Visual Arts Standards come from the US National Art Education Association.

Creating
  • Explore and experiment imaginatively with ideas and materials through collaboration.
  • Use observation and investigation in preparation for making a work of art.
  • Explore uses of materials and tools to create works of art or design, using developmentally appropriate craftsmanship.
  • Demonstrate safe and proper procedures for using materials, tools, and equipment.
  • Identify and classify uses of everyday objects through diverse visual art media.
  • Use art vocabulary to describe choices while creating art.
Presenting
  • Explain why some objects, artifacts, and artwork are valued over others.
  • Ask and answer questions such as where, when, why, and how artwork should be prepared for presentation or preservation.
  • Identify the roles and responsibilities of people who work in and visit traditional and emerging presentation spaces.
Responding
  • Compare images that represent the same subject.
  • Select and describe works of art that illustrate daily life experiences.
  • Interpret art by categorizing subject matter and describing relevant details while using appropriate art vocabulary.
  • Classify artwork based on different reasons for preferences.
Connecting
  • Identify times, places, and reasons students make art outside of school.
  • Express how people from different places and times have made art for a variety of reasons.

The BWYA Drama Standards come from the US Educational Theatre Association’s Core Theatre Standards.

Creating
  • Propose potential choices characters could make in a guided drama experience (e.g., process drama, story drama, creative drama).
  • With prompting and support, use non-representational materials to create props, puppets, and costume pieces for dramatic play or a guided drama experience (e.g., process drama, story drama, creative drama).
  • Identify ways in which gestures and movement may be used to create or retell a story in guided drama experiences (e.g., process drama, story drama, creative drama).
  • Contribute to the development of a sequential plot in a guided drama experience (e.g., process drama, story drama, creative drama).
  • With prompting and support, participate in group decision making in a guided drama experience (e.g., process drama, story drama, creative drama).
  • Contribute to the adaptation of the plot in a guided drama experience (e.g., process drama, story drama, creative drama).
  • Identify similarities and differences in sounds and movements in a guided drama experience (e.g., process drama, story drama, creative drama).
  • Collaborate to imagine multiple representations of a single object in a guided drama experience (e.g., process drama, story drama, creative drama).
Performance
  • Describe a story’s character actions and dialogue in a guided drama experience (e.g., process drama, story drama, creative drama).
  • Use body, face, gestures, and voice to communicate character traits and emotions in a guided drama experience (e.g., process drama, story drama, creative drama).
  • With prompting and support, identify and understand that physical movement is fundamental to guided drama experiences (e.g., process drama, story drama, creative drama).
  • With prompting and support, identify technical elements that can be used in a guided drama experience (e.g., process drama, story drama, creative drama).
  • With prompting and support, use movement and gestures to communicate emotions in a guided drama experience (e.g., process drama, story drama, creative drama).
Responding
  • Recall choices made in a guided drama experience (e.g., process drama, story drama, creative drama).
  • Explain preferences and emotions in a guided drama experience (e.g., process drama, story drama, creative drama), or age-appropriate theatre performance.
  • Identify causes of character actions in a guided drama experience (e.g., process drama, story drama, or creative drama).
  • Explain or use text to describe how personal emotions and choices compare to the emotions and choices of characters in a guided drama experience (e.g., process drama, story drama, creative drama).
  • Build on others’ ideas in a guided drama experience (e.g., process drama, story drama, creative drama).
  • Identify props and costumes that might be used in a guided drama experience (e.g., process drama, story drama, creative drama).
  • Compare and contrast the experiences of characters in a guided drama experience (e.g., process drama, story drama, creative drama).
Connecting
  • Identify character emotions in a guided drama experience (e.g., process drama, story drama, creative drama) and relate it to personal experience.
  • Apply skills and knowledge from different art forms and content areas in a guided drama experience (e.g., process drama, story drama, creative drama).
  • Identify similarities and differences in stories from one’s own community in a guided drama experience (e.g., process drama, story drama, creative drama).
  • Collaborate on the creation of a short scene based on a fictional literary source in a guided drama experience (e.g., process drama, story drama, creative drama).

Physical Education

Physical Education

The BWYA Physical Education Standards come from the Shape America Grade Level Outcomes.

Overview

By the end of Grade 5, the learner will demonstrate competence in fundamental motor skills and selected combinations of skills; use basic movement concepts in dance, gymnastics and small-sided practice tasks; identify basic health-related fitness concepts; exhibit acceptance of self and others in physical activities; and identify the benefits of a physically active lifestyle.

Motor Skills and Movement Patterns
  • Hops, gallops, jogs and slides using a mature pattern.
  • Demonstrates 2 of the 5 critical elements for jumping and landing in a horizontal plane using two-foot take-offs and landings.
  • Demonstrates 2 of the 5 critical elements for jumping and landing in a vertical plane.
  • Combines locomotor and non-locomotor skills in a teacher-designed dance.
  • Maintains stillness on different bases of support with different body shapes.
  • Transfer weight form one body part to another in self-space in dance and gymnastics.
  • Rolls with either a narrow or curled body shape.
  • Demonstrates twisting, curling, bending and stretching actions.
  • Throws underhand, demonstrating 2 of the 5 critical elements of a mature pattern.
  • Catches a soft object from a self-toss before it bounces.
  • Catches various sizes of balls self-tossed or tossed by a skilled thrower.
  • Dribbles continuously in self-space using the preferred hand.
  • Taps or dribbles a ball using the inside of the foot while walking in general space.
  • Volleys an object with an open palm, sending it upward.
  • Strikes a ball with a short-handled implement, sending it upward.
  • Jumps forward or backwards consecutively using a self-turning rope.
  • Jumps a long rope up to 5 times consecutively with teacher-assisted turning.
Movement and Performance
  • Moves in self-space and general space in response to designated beats or rhythms.
  • Travels demonstrating low, middle and high levels.
  • Travels demonstrating a variety of relationships with objects (e.g., over, under, around, through).
  • Differentiates between fast and slow speeds.
  • Differentiates between strong and light force.
Physical Activity and Fitness
  • Discusses the benefits of being active and exercising and/or playing.
  • Engages actively in physical education class.
  • Identifies the heart as a muscle that grows stronger with exercise, play and physical activity.
  • Differentiates between healthy and unhealthy foods.
Responsible Personal and Social Behaviour
  • Accepts personal responsibility by using equipment and space appropriately.
  • Follows the rules and parameters of the learning environment.
  • Responds appropriately to general feedback from the teacher.
  • Works independently with others in a variety of class environments (e.g., small and large groups).
  • Exhibits the established protocols for class activities.
  • Follows teacher directions for safe participation and proper use of equipment without teacher reminders.
Values Physical Activity
  • Identifies physical activity as a component of good health.
  • Recognizes that challenge in physical activity can lead to success.
  • Describes positive feelings that result from participating in physical activity.
  • Discusses personal reasons (i.e., the “why”) for enjoying physical activity.

Schoolwide Learner Outcomes

Schoolwide Learner Outcomes

The BWYA Schoolwide Learner Outcomes were developed by Beijing World Youth Academy.

Respect

We show respect in the way we treat others and are tolerant of our differences

International Mindedness

We show our international-mindedness in the way we work to make our school, community, and world a better place.

Fairness

We show our fairness in the way we share, listen, stay open-minded, and play by the rules.

Caring

We show that we are caring in the way that we are kind, compassionate, and happy to help.

Resilience

We show our resilience in the way that we persevere, believe in ourselves, and always do our best.

Adaptability

We show our adaptability in the way that we are flexible, abide by local rules and customs, and practice ‘give and take’.

Knowledge

We show our knowledge by having inquiring minds, and by striving to be independent learners that are happy to engage socially and intellectually.